iodhadh:

Y’all, please listen to this song. This is Mongolian folk rock by a new band called the HU, it’s the only song they’ve got out so far but it is a strong start, holy shit.

According to one of the comments on the video, it’s sung from the perspective of the spirits of the ancestors, who are lamenting that politicians aren’t keeping their word, Mongolians are discriminating against each other over their provincial origin or bloodline, and the traditional wisdom of the elders is being lost. The English translation in the captions isn’t great, but you really don’t need it to enjoy the song. This is going to be stuck in my head all weekend.

artekka:

honeysucklepink:

tchrgleek:

pizzopaps:

flaminggoosememe:

hyrude:

i was in a thrift shop the other day and they were playing the most unsettling variations of normal christmas music, culminating in this rendition of the 12 days of christmas except it was like 12 guys all singing over each other and going “no!” and interrupting the lyrics with random other phrases until they deadass just started singing 5 golden rings to toto’s africa. can anyone confirm that this is a real song and not that i stroked so hard i astral projected into a universe where everything is somehow worse than it is here

https://youtu.be/2Fe11OlMiz8

I remember listening to this in grade school. I am going to go get some Chinese food.

this is what my anxiety attacks sound like

Oh I needed this laugh this evening. Thank you so much.

In case anyone didn’t want to leave Tumblr and just hit “play”

Straight No Chaser has a number of Christmas albums. (y)

kaydeefalls:

Generals – multifandom vid by kaydeefalls

We got strength in numbers and they’re going to pay for it. Our princesses are now generals. Deal with it.

The Mynabirds – Generals

I need a political job in a blue collar town
So I can pay my rent
When the music is on, I get my best blood drawn
But I haven’t made a dollar yet

Haven’t I paid my dues?
Haven’t I paid my dues?
Haven’t I paid my dues yet?

Calling all my generals
My daughters
My revolutionists
We got strength in numbers
And they’re goin’ to pay for it

We burn the money in our homes
Oh our books and bones are breaking down so fast
But they keep putting all our cash
Into the next bloodbath
Honey, tell you I am sick of it

Haven’t I paid my dues?
Haven’t I paid my dues?
Haven’t I paid my dues yet?

Hey all my sisters (yeah)
What you want (love)
And all my brothers (yeah)
What you got (love)

You wanna fix it (yeah)
Or fuck it up
Come on fix it
‘Cause it’s been fucked

Calling all my generals
My daughters
My revolutionists
We got strength in numbers
And they’re goin’ to pay for it

Get your black boots on
Get your black boots on
Get your black, black, black boots on

Beat your marching drum
Beat your marching drum
Beat your marching drum

We’re gonna make ’em run
We’re gonna make ’em run
We’re gonna get ’em on the run

So get your warpaint on
So get your warpaint on
Let ’em know we’re out for blood

howwhywhen:

pony-fuhrer-bradley:

alphieralphie:

Musical infographics. 

Very important

Perfection

behindthegrooves:

On this day in music history: September 1, 1987 – “Document”, the fifth album by R.E.M. is released. Produced by R.E.M. and Scott Litt, it is recorded at Sound Emporium in Nashville, TN and Master Control in Los Angeles, CA from April 30 – May 2, 1987. By 1987, R.E.M. have steadily climbed the ladder of success, going from a having a small but loyal following in the early 80’s, to scoring consecutive Gold albums with minimal airplay. Having worked with co-producer Don Gehman on their fourth album “Life’s Rich Pagent”, the band intend to work with him again on the follow up. Gehman is unable to work with them, when sessions on Mellencamp’s “The Lonesome Jubilee” drag on for nearly nine months. Instead, he suggests they work with recording engineer Scott Litt. R.E.M. and Litt establish an instant rapport, and marks the beginning of a successful working relationship that spans five albums. Several songs on the new album make commentary on the conservative political environment of the US, under Ronald Reagan’s presidency, on tracks like “Exhuming McCarthy” and “Welcome To The Occupation”. The Athens, GA band’s fifth release marks a major turning point in their career, providing them with their long awaited mainstream breakthrough. The release of “Document is led by the single “The One I Love” (#9 Pop),which becomes R.E.M’s first US top ten hit, and their highest charting single to date. It is followed by “It’s The End Of The World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)” (#69 Pop), giving a verbal nod to Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean Homesick Blues”, with its vivid stream of conscious word play and imagery. The album spins off a third and final single with “Finest Worksong” in March of 1988. R.E.M. reaches a new plateau of chart success and record sales with “Document”, just as the band’s contract with I.R.S. Records is coming to an end. Unable to hold on to their biggest band, I.R.S. loses them to Warner Bros. Records, who offer R.E.M. a lucrative multi-album deal. “Document” is remastered and reissued on CD in 1999, issued in a mini LP sleeve that replicates the original vinyl album release. The album is also remixed into Dolby Digital and DTS 5.1 surround sound, and released as a DVD-A disc in 2003. The disc also includes the music videos for all three singles. In 2005, it is issued as a hybrid DualDisc featuring the original stereo mix and the DTS 5.1 surround mix, along with the aforementioned music videos. To commemorate its twenty fifth anniversary in 2012, “Document” is reissued as a double CD box set. Featuring the original eleven song album on disc one, the second disc features a live concert recorded at the Musikcentrum Vredenburg in Utrecht, Holland on September 14, 1987. The album is most recently reissued as a limited edition (to 2,500 copies) 180 gram gold vinyl pressing on May 31, 2018. “Document” peaks at number ten on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

please. tell us more about your ‘folk bangers’ playlist. that sounds relevant to all of my interests. (folks and banging)

deadpanwalking:

natalunasans:

ventureonwilderseas:

axonsandsynapses:

auber-jean:

lotstradamus:

if you want a playlist for banging folks this probably isn’t the one for you, but if you want to Go Off, Historically then WHAT’S UP 

🤘🏻

@axonsandsynapses

a) This is terrific

b) Have some more! (Most of these are traditional, a few of them are more contemporary)

c) I’ve put them all in an actual YouTube playlist, here, for your listening convenience

Oh, hey! My favorite genre! I hope you all like shanties and Irish:

English (but not shanties):
Hills of Connemara – Gaelic Storm
Shady Grove – Crooked Still (a good band for this sort of thing)
The Elfin Knight – Kate Rusby

Shanties/shanty-style sea songs:
Ring Down Below – Storm Weather Shanty Choir
South Australia – The Kilkennys
Barrett’s Privateers – The Real McKenzies (modern but you’d be hard-pressed to tell)
Blood Red Roses – Storm Weather Shanty Choir
10,000 Miles Away – The Seadogs

Irish:
Dúlamán – Anuna
Nil Na La – Solas
Óró Sé do Bheatha Bhaile – Seo Linn
Si Do Mhaimeo I – Méav Ní Mhaolchatha and Mairead Nesbitt

Instrumental:
The Landlord’s Walk – Blair Douglas
Gravel Walk – The Rogues (WOW what a jam!)
O’Sullivan’s March – (Linked is The Chieftains’ version, here’s the Boston Pops version I grew up on)

Bonus Macedonian song: Sto Mi et Milo – Kitka (a great group if you’re interested in Eastern European music)

i can’t believe nothing from the Pogues was on here, it must be just assumed that people would know them.

for Klezmetal music, i want to recommend GEVOLT.

behindthegrooves:

On this day in music history: August 4, 1984 – “Purple Rain” by Prince & The Revolution hits #1 on the Billboard Top 200 for 24 weeks, also topping the R&B album chart for 19 weeks on July 28, 1984. Produced by Prince, it is recorded at First Avenue in Minneapolis, MN, Sunset Sound in Hollywood, CA, The Record Plant in Los Angeles, CA, and The Warehouse in St. Louis Park, MN from August 1983 – March 1984. The recording of the soundtrack album to the highly successful film begins with the recording of the tracks “I Would Die 4 U”, “Baby I’m A Star” and the title track, which are all recorded at a live benefit performance at the First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis, also marking guitarist Wendy Melvoin’s live debut appearance with the band. “Let’s Go Crazy” is cut in The Revolution’s rehearsal space after Prince asks engineer Susan Rogers to take his home recording studio equipment out of his private residence and install it at The Warehouse. The remaining tracks are recorded in regular studios over the next couple of months, with the live recordings receiving some overdubbing and sweetening. Like the film, the soundtrack album is an enormous success, spinning off five hit singles including “When Doves Cry” (#1 Pop and R&B), “Let’s Go Crazy” (#1 Pop and R&B) and the title track (#2 Pop, #4 R&B). It wins two Grammy Awards (Best Rock Vocal Performance By Duo Or Group and Best Album of Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or TV Special), and an Academy Award for Best Original Song Score in 1985. The album is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2011, and into the National Recording Registry by The Library Of Congress in 2012. “Purple Rain” is certified 13x Platinum in the US by the RIAA, and receives a Diamond Certification.

prokopetz:

I am 100% convinced that Gorillaz killed and ate all of the other late 1990s fake cartoon bands and thereby absorbed their powers, and that’s the real reason they’re the only example of the type anyone remembers these days.

kat2107:

daimaouffxiv:

forever-afk:

oh my god

Okay, this is awesome.

whatever you are expecting, this is not it!