jawnwats:

prismatic-bell:

cj-amused:

tenoko1:

evildorito:

onewordtest:

trikruwriter:

“This is your daily, friendly reminder to use commas instead of periods during the dialogue of your story,” she said with a smile.

“Unless you are following the dialogue with an action and not a dialogue tag.” He took a deep breath and sat back down after making the clarifying statement. 

“However,” she added, shifting in her seat, “it’s appropriate to use a comma if there’s action in the middle of a sentence.”

“True.” She glanced at the others. “You can also end with a period if you include an action between two separate statements.”

Things I didn’t know

“And–” she waved a pen as though to underline her statement–“if you’re interrupting a sentence with an action, you need to type two hyphens to make an en-dash.”

You guys have no idea how many students in my advanced fiction workshop didn’t know any of this when writing their stories.

femalemarvelfanatic:

charlesoberonn:

a-heavily-glazed-donut:

l20music:

4sk-l4tul4-pyrop3:

micaxiii:

deductionfreak:

hazelguay:

The most valuable chart…

image

yes thanks for colouring it I had a hard time reading that

// I’m going to reblog this to help all RPers when it comes to descriptions

// Even if you’re a great RPer you still need this.

// To describe

// y’know

// the things

Im not a writer but im sure i have some followers that are so here yall go!

taa daa

share this with your friends, @charlesoberonn

I shall. It’s a great ref.

To all my fellow writers who have trouble coming up with the perfect word to use!

octoswan:

I made these as a way to compile all the geographical vocabulary that I thought was useful and interesting for writers. Some descriptors share categories, and some are simplified, but for the most part everything is in its proper place. Not all the words are as useable as others, and some might take tricky wording to pull off, but I hope these prove useful to all you writers out there!

(save the images to zoom in on the pics)

A list of things Steve Rogers would historically be unfamiliar with:

ohsweetcrepes:

ardentlythieving:

buckobarns:

buckobarns:

buckobarns:

I fell down a rabbit hole of research about inventions circa the 40s and was surprised by a bunch of things that have been around way longer than I thought and some that are strangely reccent, and compiled them into a list. Aka, a resource for fic writers.

  • Bananas (or rather, the ones we have today. The ones he’d be accustomed to, the Gros Michel, a sweeter, creamier species, went extinct in the 50s and was replaced with the bland Cavendish banana.)
  • High-fives (the low-five was actually invented first, around WW2, and he may have been familiar with that)
  • Buffalo Wings (invented in the 60s)
  • CPR (not really used until the late 40s, not widely known until the 50s)
  • Tiramisu (invented in the 80s)
  • Big Macs & McNuggets (while McDonald’s was founded in 1940, the former wasn’t introduced until the 60s, and the latter, the 80s)
  • Seat belts (the first car to have one was in the late 40s, and only became mandatory to wear them in the 80s. holy shit.) 
  • Walmart (invented in 1962. Or really, the large-scale supermarkets as we know them today really)
  • Yellow tennis balls (prior to the 70s they were usually black or white)
  • Panadol (first sold in the US in the 50s)
  • The smiley face aka 🙂 (popularised in the 60s)

Now alternatively, here’s a list of things Steve WOULD (or possibly would) be familiar with:

I’m not sure why some of these surprised me.

  • Modern Sunglasses (have been around a lot longer than I thought, and were mass produced in the 20s)
  • Nokia (was first founded in 1865. I’m not kidding. They began as a pulp mill and moved into making rubber respirators for military from the 30s onwards)
  • Nintendo (been around since 1889 as a toy company, during the 40s they made playing cards. Wouldn’t be implausible that he knew about Nintendo, perhaps from Morita)
  • Krispy Kreme (opened in 1937, didn’t spread widely until the 50s however)
  • Kool-Aid (introduced in the 30s)
  • Oreos (introduced in 1912)
  • Printed/graphic tees (didn’t become a trend until the 60s-70s, but they certainly existed in the 40s)
  • Hoodies (originated in the 30s, worn by workers in cold New York warehouses. Meaning, it’s entirely plausible Bucky could’ve been wearing hoodies in the 40s)
  • Malls (they weren’t called that back then, but they certainly had shopping centres or plazas since the 1800s)
  • Converse sneakers (invented in 1908 and have barely changed since!)

I didn’t expect anyone to really reblog this wow! Here’s a couple more things to add to the list:

Would not have known about:

  • Velcro (patented in 1951)
  • Modern Sunscreen (in 1944 they had ‘Red Vet Pet’, used by soldiers it was described as a “disagreeable red, sticky substance similar to petroleum jelly”)
  • Bubble Wrap (1957)
  • Slinkies (Not sold until 1947)
  • Microwave oven (invented just a year after he went under)
  • Frisbees (invented in 1948)
  • Acrylic paint (not sold commercially until the 50s)
  • Roller blades (1979)

Would have likely known about:

  • Reeses’s Peanut Butter Cups (introduced in 1928)
  • Mountain Dew (introduced in 1940)
  • Twinkies (1930)
  • M&M’s (1941)
  • Lay’s Potato Chips (1932)
  • Tootsie Pops (1931)
  • Levi’s Jeans (been around since the 1850s!)
  • Duct Tape (been around since the early 1900′s, at this time it was called duck tape)
  • 3-D movies (the first 3-D movie with the red/blue glasses was in 1922!)
  • Monopoly (1935)
  • Nescafe coffee (1938)

Coming back to this because I found out a few more!

More things he would likely not be familiar with:

  • Butter chicken (1950s)
  • Wireless TV remote (invented 1955)
  • Superglue (not sold until 1958)
  • Saran wrap (1949. ok and cool fact, the name Saran comes from the combined names of the creators cat and dog, Sarah and Ann!)
  • Colour TV (invented in his time, but not broadcasted until the 50s)  

Things he would possibly/likely be familiar with:

  • Electric guitars (invented 1931)
  • Electric washing machines (as early as 1904. They look nothing like they do now though and I doubt he owned one.)
  • Laundromats (since the 30s or earlier)
  • Electric razors (produced in 1937)
  • Air conditioner (invented in 1902)
  • Pop up toaster (1919)
  • Robots (in 1928 the humanoid robot Eric was created. Funnily enough during Steve’s time the word ‘robot’ was pronounced as ‘row-boat’) 
  • Pez candy (1927)

@radio-charlie

… omg i didn’t know steve’s bouncy frisbee of death predated actual frisbees I’M SO DELIGHTED RN

The three types of flaw

the-right-writing:

1. Demeanor Flaws (ex: rudeness, extreme shyness)

Demeanor flaws make it hard for other characters to see a character’s core personality. Sometimes a character will hurt others without meaning to because of their demeanor. It’s easy, when giving a character demeanor flaws, to portray anybody who misunderstands or is hurt by them as shallow jerks who should spend more time with the poor, lovable character. This should not be the case. People are not obligated, for example, to stick with people who are rude to them. Also, doing this makes the demeanor flaw less of a flaw.

2. Personality Flaws (ex: rigidity, hubris, insecurity)

The most common and my favorite to read about. These are generally what people think about when they think of character flaws. Trying to get over one of these flaws is the arc of many a well-written character.

3. Alignment Flaws (ex: zealotry, fighting for the bad guys)

Somebody can be a nice person with no obvious personality flaws and still, for some reason or another, choose the wrong side. Such characters are a good way to add emotional depth to your stories because they need to be out of the way for the protagonists to win, but they are not fundamentally bad people.

Decoding dress codes

fashioninfographics:

decoding dress code casual
decoding dress code business casual
decoding dress code business attire
decoding dress code festive attire garden party
decoding dress code semi-formal
decoding dress code black tie optional creative
decoding dress code black tie

Via

theshitpostcalligrapher:

breelandwalker:

nineprotons:

“Got the morbs” should be a thing.

Victorian slang is AMAZING, and select phrases really need to make a comeback.

“Bitch the pot” – Pour the tea (HOW RELEVANT IS THIS!?)

“Bang up the elephant” – Absolutely perfect; super stylish

“Well, that’s shot the bale” – Something that has missed the mark entirely

“Church-bell” – A woman prone to gossip

“Chuckaboo” – A dear friend, a bosom chum

“Beer and skittles” – A great time (see also: Irish Gaelic “craic”)

“Butter on bacon” – Something overdone or too extravagant

“Cupid’s kettle drums” – Breasts, particularly large ones

“Gigglemug” – A cheerful smiling face

sinnaisanemotionalman:

thatawkwardtinyperson:

disneysmermaids:

cherribalm:

site that you can type in the definition of a word and get the word

site for when you can only remember part of a word/its definition 

site that gives you words that rhyme with a word

site that gives you synonyms and antonyms

THAT FIRST SITE IS EVERY WRITER’S DREAM DO YOU KNOW HOW MANY TIMES I’VE TRIED WRITING SOMETHING AND THOUGHT GOD DAMN IS THERE A SPECIFIC WORD FOR WHAT I’M USING TWO SENTENCES TO DESCRIBE AND JUST GETTING A BUNCH OF SHIT GOOGLE RESULTS

God yes reblog to save a writers life

None of the links work (tumblr failed to redirect, here’s my post on how to fix it) So here are their addresses:

http://onelook.com/reverse-dictionary.shtml

http://chir.ag/projects/tip-of-my-tongue/

https://www.rhymezone.com/

http://www.thesaurus.com/

jawnwats:

prismatic-bell:

cj-amused:

tenoko1:

evildorito:

onewordtest:

trikruwriter:

“This is your daily, friendly reminder to use commas instead of periods during the dialogue of your story,” she said with a smile.

“Unless you are following the dialogue with an action and not a dialogue tag.” He took a deep breath and sat back down after making the clarifying statement. 

“However,” she added, shifting in her seat, “it’s appropriate to use a comma if there’s action in the middle of a sentence.”

“True.” She glanced at the others. “You can also end with a period if you include an action between two separate statements.”

Things I didn’t know

“And–” she waved a pen as though to underline her statement–“if you’re interrupting a sentence with an action, you need to type two hyphens to make an en-dash.”

You guys have no idea how many students in my advanced fiction workshop didn’t know any of this when writing their stories.