If you’re a writer and you see this post, stop what you’re doing.

mark-helsing:

WHENEVER YOU SEE THIS POST ON YOUR DASH, STOP WHAT YOU’RE DOING AND WRITE ONE SENTENCE FOR YOUR CURRENT PROJECT.

Just one sentence. Stop blogging for one minute and write a single sentence. It could be dialogue, it could be a nice description of scenery, it could be a metaphor, I don’t care. The point is, do it. Then, when you finish, you can get back to blogging.

If this gets viral, you might just have your novel finished by next Tuesday.

sapphicauthor:

THINGS WHICH MAKE WRITERS ANXIOUS:

  • not writing
  • writing
  • people reading their stories
  • people not reading their stories

crmediagal:

me, a fanfic writer: *touches my new fav character’s face* *whispers* I’m gonna get you laid

femalemarvelfanatic:

charlesoberonn:

a-heavily-glazed-donut:

l20music:

4sk-l4tul4-pyrop3:

micaxiii:

deductionfreak:

hazelguay:

The most valuable chart…

image

yes thanks for colouring it I had a hard time reading that

// I’m going to reblog this to help all RPers when it comes to descriptions

// Even if you’re a great RPer you still need this.

// To describe

// y’know

// the things

Im not a writer but im sure i have some followers that are so here yall go!

taa daa

share this with your friends, @charlesoberonn

I shall. It’s a great ref.

To all my fellow writers who have trouble coming up with the perfect word to use!

teacup-universes:

I think it’s important to praise and uplift writers who don’t write pretty. Prose that sticks close to the ground is valuable, wonderful, and yes, still takes a lot of work to compose. Think of stories like houses. Ornately-decorated Victorian homes are lovely, so are palaces with sprawling gardens. But I love a small, snug and plainly-built story, where I can make myself at home for a while.

If you write honestly, you can tell a beautiful story. Even if the writing itself is not. It may not make for eye-catching excerpts and quotes, but plain writing isn’t necessarily boring or bad. Sometimes the best way to tell a story is to tell it simply, and I think that’s important to remember.

octoswan:

I made these as a way to compile all the geographical vocabulary that I thought was useful and interesting for writers. Some descriptors share categories, and some are simplified, but for the most part everything is in its proper place. Not all the words are as useable as others, and some might take tricky wording to pull off, but I hope these prove useful to all you writers out there!

(save the images to zoom in on the pics)

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

Want more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

Reactions to tragedy

the-right-writing:

In real life, pretty much everybody reacts to tragedy differently. So why is it that every author has their pet reaction to tragedy that all their characters use? Not only is it unrealistic, but it takes away the chance for the characters’ different reactions to reveal things about themselves.

Possible reactions to tragedy (not an exhaustive list):

  • Distracting oneself with mindless activities
  • Distracting oneself with others’ humor
  • Distracting oneself by making jokes
  • Distracting oneself by reading/watching/playing stories
  • Distracting oneself with hard mental work
  • Distracting oneself with hard physical work
  • Distracting oneself with creative endeavors
  • Distracting oneself by chatting with friends about normal things
  • Talking to friends about the tragedy
  • Talking to authority figures about the tragedy
  • Talking anonymously with strangers about the tragedy (if possible)
  • Getting wrapped up in others’ problems
  • Staying unusually silent
  • Screaming
  • Crying loudly
  • Crying silently
  • Doing everything possible not to cry
  • Pacing
  • Taking unhealthy risks
  • Going for revenge against whoever one can blame
  • Punching random objects
  • Throwing random objects
  • Lashing out against friends and family members
  • Trying to prevent a similar tragedy from happening
  • Eating more than usual
  • Not eating
  • Taking mind-altering substances
  • Getting in unhealthy relationships
  • Isolating oneself
  • Obsessing over routine
  • Numbness combined with apathy
  • Numbness combined with going through one’s normal motions
  • Trying to get things back the way they were
  • Denial
  • No reaction at first but a reaction hits later in greater force
  • No reaction at all. Emotions relating to the tragedy just fail to load. Note that this can happen to anybody and does not mark a character as a sociopath.

Characters can have more than one reaction at the same time, one reaction after another, or different reactions to different tragedies.

editorkat:

THINGS WRITERS SHOULD DO TODAY: 

  • Write 
  • Straighten their backs 
  • Celebrate their victories 
  • Write anything 
  • Take the empty cups out of their rooms 
  • Seriously. Stop overthinking and just write